macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news

The latest version of macOS High Sierra, 10.13.4, is here, and with it comes a big new feature: official support for external GPUs. There are, of course, some other fixes and new features with this update, but eGPU support definitely steals much of the spotlight for itself. Before you dive into the wonderful world of increased graphics power, Apple has some recommendations to get the most out of external graphics support.

These recommendations (and, in some cases, requirements), are outlined over on a new Apple support page. First thing’s first: your Mac is going to need Thunderbolt 3 functionality, which limits the machines that support eGPUs to 2016 MacBook Pros and later, 2017 iMacs and later, and the iMac Pro. Assuming you have one of those computers, Apple recommends a number of graphics cards and Thunderbolt 3 chassis.

A number of AMD cards make the list, including the Radeon RX 570, 580, Pro WX 7100, RX Vega 56, RX Vega 64, Vega Frontier Edition Air, and Pro WX 9100. Apple recommends specific chassis for each of these graphics cards, with manufacturers like OWC, PowerColor, Sapphire, and Sonnet all making the list. NVIDIA cards are notably missing of Apple’s recommendations, so for now, you’ll want to stick with AMD cards if you’re looking to use an eGPU to use with your Mac.

It’s worth pointing out that any Thunderbolt 3 enclosure you pick for your GPU needs to output enough power to charge your MacBook Pro. All of the chassis Apple lists check that box, so if you’re unsure, it’s not a bad idea to stick with the official recommendations. You can use multiple eGPUs by plugging them into different Thunderbolt 3 ports (don’t daisy chain them together, in other words), and to disconnect your eGPU, simply click the new chip icon you see in the image above.

While Apple launched eGPU support primarily so Mac owners can accelerate applications like Metal, OpenGL, and OpenCL, you can also use an external GPU to give a boost to your games or VR applications. In the case of games, Apple recommends plugging an external monitor directly to the eGPU, while it says VR users should connect their headset directly to it as well. Be sure to read through Apple’s full support document for more on which graphics cards and chassis you should use for your eGPU set up, and enjoy that extra power.

Original Text ►► macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news


macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news

The latest version of macOS High Sierra, 10.13.4, is here, and with it comes a big new feature: official support for external GPUs. There are, of course, some other fixes and new features with this update, but eGPU support definitely steals much of the spotlight for itself. Before you dive into the wonderful world of increased graphics power, Apple has some recommendations to get the most out of external graphics support.

These recommendations (and, in some cases, requirements), are outlined over on a new Apple support page. First thing’s first: your Mac is going to need Thunderbolt 3 functionality, which limits the machines that support eGPUs to 2016 MacBook Pros and later, 2017 iMacs and later, and the iMac Pro. Assuming you have one of those computers, Apple recommends a number of graphics cards and Thunderbolt 3 chassis.

A number of AMD cards make the list, including the Radeon RX 570, 580, Pro WX 7100, RX Vega 56, RX Vega 64, Vega Frontier Edition Air, and Pro WX 9100. Apple recommends specific chassis for each of these graphics cards, with manufacturers like OWC, PowerColor, Sapphire, and Sonnet all making the list. NVIDIA cards are notably missing of Apple’s recommendations, so for now, you’ll want to stick with AMD cards if you’re looking to use an eGPU to use with your Mac.

It’s worth pointing out that any Thunderbolt 3 enclosure you pick for your GPU needs to output enough power to charge your MacBook Pro. All of the chassis Apple lists check that box, so if you’re unsure, it’s not a bad idea to stick with the official recommendations. You can use multiple eGPUs by plugging them into different Thunderbolt 3 ports (don’t daisy chain them together, in other words), and to disconnect your eGPU, simply click the new chip icon you see in the image above.

While Apple launched eGPU support primarily so Mac owners can accelerate applications like Metal, OpenGL, and OpenCL, you can also use an external GPU to give a boost to your games or VR applications. In the case of games, Apple recommends plugging an external monitor directly to the eGPU, while it says VR users should connect their headset directly to it as well. Be sure to read through Apple’s full support document for more on which graphics cards and chassis you should use for your eGPU set up, and enjoy that extra power.

Original Text ►► macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news


macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news

The latest version of macOS High Sierra, 10.13.4, is here, and with it comes a big new feature: official support for external GPUs. There are, of course, some other fixes and new features with this update, but eGPU support definitely steals much of the spotlight for itself. Before you dive into the wonderful world of increased graphics power, Apple has some recommendations to get the most out of external graphics support.

These recommendations (and, in some cases, requirements), are outlined over on a new Apple support page. First thing’s first: your Mac is going to need Thunderbolt 3 functionality, which limits the machines that support eGPUs to 2016 MacBook Pros and later, 2017 iMacs and later, and the iMac Pro. Assuming you have one of those computers, Apple recommends a number of graphics cards and Thunderbolt 3 chassis.

A number of AMD cards make the list, including the Radeon RX 570, 580, Pro WX 7100, RX Vega 56, RX Vega 64, Vega Frontier Edition Air, and Pro WX 9100. Apple recommends specific chassis for each of these graphics cards, with manufacturers like OWC, PowerColor, Sapphire, and Sonnet all making the list. NVIDIA cards are notably missing of Apple’s recommendations, so for now, you’ll want to stick with AMD cards if you’re looking to use an eGPU to use with your Mac.

It’s worth pointing out that any Thunderbolt 3 enclosure you pick for your GPU needs to output enough power to charge your MacBook Pro. All of the chassis Apple lists check that box, so if you’re unsure, it’s not a bad idea to stick with the official recommendations. You can use multiple eGPUs by plugging them into different Thunderbolt 3 ports (don’t daisy chain them together, in other words), and to disconnect your eGPU, simply click the new chip icon you see in the image above.

While Apple launched eGPU support primarily so Mac owners can accelerate applications like Metal, OpenGL, and OpenCL, you can also use an external GPU to give a boost to your games or VR applications. In the case of games, Apple recommends plugging an external monitor directly to the eGPU, while it says VR users should connect their headset directly to it as well. Be sure to read through Apple’s full support document for more on which graphics cards and chassis you should use for your eGPU set up, and enjoy that extra power.

Original Text ►► macOS external GPU support: Here’s the good and bad news


Fortnite Battle Royale update 3.4 is live – Here’s what’s new

Fortnite Battle Royale version 3.4 is here and it seems to add quite a bit to the game that is currently taking the world by storm. There are, of course, plenty of bug fixes and optimizations being made in this patch, but those are never the exciting parts of a new update. It probably goes without saying, but most players are likely looking forward to the new weapons and game modes coming along with this patch.

If you’ve been craving a new weapon with which to dispatch your enemies, then the 3.4 update isn’t going to disappoint. Epic has added a new guided missile weapon to the game, and looking at the stats, it’s definitely going to do some damage. We would expect explosives to rain destruction upon their targets, but there’s a trade off when using this new system: When you take control of the missle to guide it to its target, your character becomes locked in place, making you very vulnerable to attack.

The good news is that if you come under attack and you react quick enough, you can disconnect from the missile to have it continue its current trajectory. It sounds like this is going to be a tricky weapon to master, but those who do will be able to blow up their enemies with scary precision. Along with the new guided missile, Epic has also replaced the grenade launcher with a new egg launcher to celebrate the Easter holiday, though this change is merely a cosmetic one.

Players will also be able to participate in a new limited-time game mode once update 3.4 has been applied. Sniper Shootout v2 is the name of the game, adding the hunting rifle and the crossbow and removing the revolver. Downed state has been disabled for this game mode, so if you’re playing on a team and you take too much damage, you’ll simply be eliminated. This game mode also restricts the frequency of legendary and epic items, limiting the former to supply drops and the latter to chests.

One interesting thing this update does is remove the 30 FPS mode from the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 versions of the game. In the patch notes, Epic writes that this update makes “some significant GPU optimizations which improved visual quality, including resolution in 60 FPS mode,” and notes that if feels there’s now “very little reason to play at 30 FPS.”

In all, it sounds like this is a big update, and it’s available now on PC, Xbox One, and PS4. Be sure to read through Epic’s long changelog to see everything that’s new, and be sure to use guided missiles responsibly should you find one on the battlefield.

 

Original Text ►► Fortnite Battle Royale update 3.4 is live – Here’s what’s new


iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade


iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade


Galaxy S8, Note 8 get GIF support for Always On Display

Samsung’s flagship smartphones have included the Always On Display (AOD) feature for several years now, giving users a way to glance at essential information like notifications, battery level, and the time, by keeping these details constantly displayed even when the device is asleep. Since then, the feature has become more customizable in terms of color and clock style, and even allowing a photo to be shown. But now there’s support for the internet’s favorite media format: the GIF.

While users have been able to choose between preset images or their own photos, the addition of GIFs on the AOD opens the door for displaying animated imagery, not to mention the meme or other humorous clip of the week. The feature comes with a handful of GIFs to use, but can be customized with any stored in the photo library.

The new AOD update is available on the Samsung Galaxy S8/S8+ and the Note 8, however these devices must be running Android Oreo. Once that’s taken care of, users will want to make sure they’re running AOD version 3.2.26.4 or later for GIF support.

There’s a limit to the length of GIFs that can be shown on the AOD, and to help prevent the feature from being an even bigger battery drain, the images won’t endlessly loop. It will play once when the device is put to sleep, but users can double tap on GIF to get it to play again.

Original Text ►► Galaxy S8, Note 8 get GIF support for Always On Display


Galaxy S8, Note 8 get GIF support for Always On Display

Samsung’s flagship smartphones have included the Always On Display (AOD) feature for several years now, giving users a way to glance at essential information like notifications, battery level, and the time, by keeping these details constantly displayed even when the device is asleep. Since then, the feature has become more customizable in terms of color and clock style, and even allowing a photo to be shown. But now there’s support for the internet’s favorite media format: the GIF.

While users have been able to choose between preset images or their own photos, the addition of GIFs on the AOD opens the door for displaying animated imagery, not to mention the meme or other humorous clip of the week. The feature comes with a handful of GIFs to use, but can be customized with any stored in the photo library.

The new AOD update is available on the Samsung Galaxy S8/S8+ and the Note 8, however these devices must be running Android Oreo. Once that’s taken care of, users will want to make sure they’re running AOD version 3.2.26.4 or later for GIF support.

There’s a limit to the length of GIFs that can be shown on the AOD, and to help prevent the feature from being an even bigger battery drain, the images won’t endlessly loop. It will play once when the device is put to sleep, but users can double tap on GIF to get it to play again.

Original Text ►► Galaxy S8, Note 8 get GIF support for Always On Display


PUBG debuts new Event Mode, with new map coming next week

While the spotlight has shifted in recent weeks from PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds to Fortnite, the former is looking to win back some of the battle royal attention with some new updates and content. The first, released on Friday, is a special, limited time game mode that revolves around a new flare gun, while next week will see the first gameplay on PUBG‘s newest map, Codename: Savage.

Those playing PUBG‘s four-player squad mode this weekend can already try out the new flare gun Event Mode. Like the name implies, flare guns can be found around the map, and shooting it into the air will prompt an airdrop to bring the team a package full of weapons and armor. The trade-off, however, is that the flare alerts everyone else of the location, meaning battles quickly form over the care package.

As this is one of the first tests of PUBG‘s take on limited time events, the flare gun mode is only available this weekend. Players will only have until April 1st at 7pm PT to try it out.

Next week will also see the debut of PUBG‘s newest map, Codename: Savage, which promises to offer a very different play experience than the two existing maps. Unlike Erangel and Miramar, which both measure 8km by 8km, the new map is just a quarter of that size, running 4km by 4km.

This smaller environment promises to speed up the game’s battle royal action, but as the developers note that the map is still in an early alpha state, it’s also only getting a limited time preview. The alpha test will run from 7pm PT on April 2nd to 4am on April 5th, and only for a limited number of players. More details are coming on Monday on how players can participate.

Original Text ►► PUBG debuts new Event Mode, with new map coming next week


PUBG debuts new Event Mode, with new map coming next week

While the spotlight has shifted in recent weeks from PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds to Fortnite, the former is looking to win back some of the battle royal attention with some new updates and content. The first, released on Friday, is a special, limited time game mode that revolves around a new flare gun, while next week will see the first gameplay on PUBG‘s newest map, Codename: Savage.

Those playing PUBG‘s four-player squad mode this weekend can already try out the new flare gun Event Mode. Like the name implies, flare guns can be found around the map, and shooting it into the air will prompt an airdrop to bring the team a package full of weapons and armor. The trade-off, however, is that the flare alerts everyone else of the location, meaning battles quickly form over the care package.

As this is one of the first tests of PUBG‘s take on limited time events, the flare gun mode is only available this weekend. Players will only have until April 1st at 7pm PT to try it out.

Next week will also see the debut of PUBG‘s newest map, Codename: Savage, which promises to offer a very different play experience than the two existing maps. Unlike Erangel and Miramar, which both measure 8km by 8km, the new map is just a quarter of that size, running 4km by 4km.

This smaller environment promises to speed up the game’s battle royal action, but as the developers note that the map is still in an early alpha state, it’s also only getting a limited time preview. The alpha test will run from 7pm PT on April 2nd to 4am on April 5th, and only for a limited number of players. More details are coming on Monday on how players can participate.

Original Text ►► PUBG debuts new Event Mode, with new map coming next week